April ’11 Cleveland Citizen Article

I would like to start off by asking everyone reading this to take a moment and say a prayer for those that have been affected by the disaster in Japan.  The country faces an uncertain future as it deals with the aftermath of the earthquake, tsunami and ongoing threat of multiple nuclear meltdowns.

Even though it is coming to the end of the school year, it is still the apprentice’s responsibility to get their OJT forms in on time.  If you have not been getting your forms in on time and are three months in arrears, the JATC will be asking for an explanation.  Be prepared to justify your actions.

There is sign up available for another OSHA 10 and Scaffolding class available for Local 17 members.  Call or see Business Agent Tim Moennich for times and dates.

At the March meeting, there was a first reading of proposed By-law changes.  Six of the changes are to make the document consistent with the International By-laws.  The seventh proposed By-law change brings missing a mandatory meeting (November, December and January as well as any specially called meetings) for any other reason than scheduled vacations or work under review of the Executive Board.  The third reading is planned for the May meeting.

There are reports that a team from Akron (Local 45) was caught working in our jurisdiction without informing the hall.  This is a reminder that if you are asked to go out of the locals jurisdiction for any reason, you are required to check in with the business agent of the local in which you are working.

At a meeting of the Cleveland Building Trades, Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Bill Mason talked about the off-shore windmill project.  The contractors are looking to install five to eight windmills three-and-a-half miles north of the crib.  The windmills will produce enough power for eight thousand homes and will be built with all union labor.  When built, these will be the first off-shore windmills in the United States and will position Ohio to be a regional hub for windmill construction, engineering and manufacturing.

As of this writing, Ohio Senate Bill 5, the bill stripping public-sector workers of their collective bargaining rights, just came out of committee in the House where it is sure to be approved and then signed by Governor John Kasich.  Once the legislative battle over SB 5 ends, the rest of the anti-union agenda will be unleashed.  In March 16th radio interview with Mike Trivisonno on Cleveland’s WTAM 1100, Kasich indicated he is looking to exempt municipalities from prevailing wage laws.

Two other pending House bills take aim at private-sector labor rights.  House Bill 61 gives private sector employers with annual sales of less than $500,000 the option of offering employees to use time off in lieu of overtime pay.  House Bill 102 prohibits agencies from entering into project labor agreements (PLA) on any public improvement project and prohibits state money going to local public improvement projects whenever a PLA has been negotiated.

While everyone’s attention is concentrated on Ohio, Wisconsin and neighboring states, the Republicans in Washington have come up with some cuts of their own:

$99 million in cuts for OSHA

$4 billion in job training and employment services

$50 million in cuts to the National Labor Relations Board,

$786 million in cuts to renewable energy and energy efficiency.

Part of the reason OSHA and the NLRB exist in the first place is because of the Triangle Shirt factory fire on March 25, 1911.  146 women, mostly Italian and eastern European Jewish  immigrants and some as young as fourteen, died when a fire ripped through the sewing factory just a few minutes short of the end of their day.

At 4:40 PM, a cigarette tossed into a wicker basket of cotton scraps caught fire and gutted the eighth, ninth and tenth floors of the Asch Building in New York City.  At least one of the exits was locked and the other blocked by fire.  The exits were routinely locked to keep workers from stealing product and would only be unlocked at quitting time.

During the frenzy the fire escape collapsed from the weight and bodies piled up on the top of the elevator as workers tried to climb down the ropes.  The greatest loss of life was from smoke and leaping the 100 feet to the pavement below in order to escape the white-hot flames.

The building had been inspected by the city the week before the fire and the owners were cited for the fire escapes.

The International Ladies garment Workers Union (ILGWU), which represented some of the 500 employed at Triangle, set up a $30,000 relief fund for the survivors and the families of the victims.  On April 2 they lead a procession of empty hearses which was joined by 50,000 workers marching in memory of their lost brethren.  They also pushed for increased pay, worker safety and a 52-hour work week for garment workers.

In the aftermath, Triangle owners Max Blanck and Isaac Harris were indicted on seven counts of second-degree manslaughter.  After a twenty-three day trial they were acquitted because the prosecutor could not prove they knew the door were locked during working hours.  Twenty-three individual civil suits followed and each was ultimately settled for $75 per life lost.

Days after the fire, Blanck and Harris set up shop a few blocks away and were cited for blocking exits, the same reason given for the massive loss of life at the fire site.  When in court, the judge apologized to the pair for the $25 fine.  The company eventually closed and to their deaths, Blanck and Harris presented their operations as models of safety and cleanliness.

When reforms in fire safety, working conditions and child labor laws were written in the years leading up to the formation of the NLRB in 1936 and OSHA in 1970, they were written in the blood of the 146 who died and the tears of those that survived.

This, my brothers and sisters, is part of our union heritage and why public and private sector unions still play an important role in worker safety and quality of life.

April ’11 Constructor Article

Brothers and sisters:

Is it clear why it is important to elect labor friendly candidates?  Cairo moved to Madison as the Republican governor tried to legislate what he could not negotiate and Governor Kasich is standing on the same precipice as his Wisconsin counterpart.  If you did not get the March issue of the Cleveland Citizen or read my article, please go to my blog at through-the-mill.com and read the post “Cairo Comes to Madison” discussing the situation as of March 1.

Please read it!

As of this writing, there are 31 members off.  How many of these brothers and sisters would be working if everyone was vigilant about protecting Article IV work?  Article IV is the part of the contract that spells out the work that is to be performed by the Elevator Constructor and it is very detailed about the work we claim.  Some of the points seem archaic, like references to steam, belt, compressed air and hand powered elevators but others, like the use of fiber optics speak to the present and future of the trade.

Every year the International wins case after case of Article IV violations by the companies and every year we in the field find reasons to let some of these blatant violations pass unchecked.

Also, do not forget Article VIII which spells out one-man and team repair work.  This is an area that the companies have exploited to our disadvantage and we need to be ever more aggressive at protecting.  Their corporate officers and our elected leadership signed the contract.  We need to be sure the companies live up to their end.  We do.

With the spring semester in full swing, here is a reminder that apprentices can only miss two classes per semester and those classes must be made up before the final exam.  Look to these pages and the Citizen for makeup dates.  Rick Myers has 16 mechanics in the hydraulic controller theory and troubleshooting class that is currently underway.  He will also be teaching an OSHA 10 class that gives you a card allowing you to work on sites that require OHSA 10 training.

The annual Retiree’s Dinner will be held on April 15th at Frank Sterle’s, 1401 East 55th Street.  As always, cocktails are served at 5:30 and dinner at 6:30.

The easiest thing to do is sit around and complain.  We all do it, don’t lie.  We complain about our jobs, our bosses, our customers, spouses, helpers, mechanics, blah, blah, blah.  How often do you take the initiative to make a positive change?  Honestly?  You have an opportunity to make an impact on the trade by submitting your ideas for the contract or by-laws for our delegates to take to the 30th General Convention in Orlando this August.  This is a real opportunity for everyone to make their voice heard on the future of the trade.  The deadline for submissions to the International is May 31st so get your ideas to Tim ASAP.

Where are they working?

Dave Hess and Joe Broz repairing water damage at the Pinnacle Building for Thyssen,

John Goggin and Ed Gimmel at EMH doing machine work for Schindler,

Jason Fredrick and Anthony Metcalf doing a mod at Villa Mars at West 70th and Detroit for Thyssen,

Neil Beechuk and Bill Dudas at the Heritage Office Building doing a three-stop mod for Thyssen,

Matt Pinchot and Scott Villanueva doing service work for Otis,

Denny Dixon, Bob Myers, Terry Keating and Tim Narowitz at the Art Museum for Kone,

Matt Weingart, Jim Archer, John Brunner, Scott Hicks, Dave Brunner, Mark Byram and Taurus Ogletree finishing up UH Caner Center for Schindler.

Condolences go out to Mark and John Ondich whose mother, Elaine, passed away February 4th.

As of this writing, there are 28 mechanics and three apprentices off.

‘till next month,

Work smart, work safe and slow down for safety.

Don

Dknapik@windstream.net

USA Clay Shooting Competition

The Union Sportsmen Alliance is an association of union members who enjoy the outdoors.  The Alliance gives members the opportunity to join fellow union sportsmen to create a better future for hunting and fishing while providing money saving deals and other great benefits.

 

On May 14th in Pittsburgh, PA the USA will host its Second Annual Clay Shooting Competition.  Deadline for entry is May 9th.  If you are interested then call Tim at the hall for further information.

NEIEP Looking For Contributors

Lift Magazine is the educational supplement for NEIEP. It is published periodically and covers specific topics like brakes, landing systems and, in the upcoming issue, new technologies in the trade. They are currently looking for people who are interested in sharing their knowledge by contributing content to the magazine. You do not need to be a professional quality writer, just have the ability to clearly communicate your knowledge on subjects. Contributors are compensated for their work. If you are interested, please submit your resume to Jon Henson at jhenson@neiep.org or call 508-699-2200 extension 6115.

Union Links

International Union of Elevator Constructors

7154 Columbia Gateway Dr.
Columbia, MD 21046
Phone Number:  (410) 953-6150
Fax: (410) 953-6169
E-Mail: (General Information) contact@iuec.org
(Webmaster) webmaster@iuec.org

National Elevator Industry Benefit Plans

19 Campus Boulevard, Suite 200
Newtown Square, PA 19073-3288
Phone Number: 1-800-523-4702

National Elevator Industry Educational Program

National Director – John O’Donnell, Jr.
Eleven Larsen Way
Attleboro Falls, MA 02763
Phone Number: 1-800-228-8220

Elevator Industry Work Preservation Fund

National Director – Jesse Bielefeld
7154 Columbia Gateway Drive
Columbia, MD 21046
Phone Number: 1-410-312-1474

Mass Mutual

Information on the 401(K) and industry annuity program

TheUnionBootPro.com

Link for discounted work boots for union members

Master Agreement Substance Abuse Information

The Substance Abuse & Mental Health Service Administration Home Page

Labor Affiliated Websites

AFL-CIO

Building & Construction Trades Department

Ohio State Building and Construction Trades

ACT OHIO

U.S. Department of Labor

NIOSH – National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

OSHA – Occupational Health & Safety Administration

Union Plus – Working for Working Families