Klokey Internment Date Set

Retired brother Carl Klokey will be interned  at the Ohio Western Reserve National Cemetery, 10175 Rawiga Road, Rittman, Ohio on June 20th at 1:30 pm.

Klokey, 66, passed away at his home on May 5th in Lorain after a sudden illness.  He was a Navy veteran serving from 1963 to 1967.  He worked in the elevator trade until 1987 and retired in 2001.  He is survived by his wife of 20 years, Cheryl, and daughters Tracy, Chrissy and Val.

Mechanics Review Dates Set

Rick Myers will be instructing a mechanics review class every Monday for six weeks starting July 25th.  Eligible apprentices must sign up by July 8th in order to attend the classes.

For further information contact Business Agent Tim Moennich at 216-431-8088 or TMoennich@iueclocal17.org.

June ’11 Cleveland Citizen

Due to the strong response to the previous welding class put on by NEIEP, a second class has been announced.  The course runs for 40 hours and will lead to a 3G and 4G certification. Classes run from June 13th through the 17th and June 20th through the 24th from 5:15 to 9:15.  Any IUEC Local 17 member interested in participating must deposit a $500 check to guarantee attendance.  If you are interested, then please contact Business Agent Tim Moennich.

NEIEP is offering an online training and licensing course called “Rigging and Signalperson.”  The course takes three to four hours to complete online.  When the student takes the exam they must score at least 70 percent.  After successfully passing the online exam, a written and participation exam will be given by the NEIEP area coordinator.  The student must pass the written test with an 80 percent and a 100 percent on the hand signals.  The rigging and signal persons card is good for three years.

As predicted here and in the labor press from around the country, Governor Kasich is setting his sights on the private sector unions through the prevailing wage laws that keep Ohio from becoming another Right-to-Work-for-Less state.  Currently, any project using government money over $78,000 must abide by the prevailing wage laws.  This keeps all except the smallest of projects paying union wages.  The governor wants to raise this floor to $5 million, functionally exempting all except the largest projects from prevailing wage.

Many years ago, those far wiser than anyone currently in the administration, realized that the building trades slogan of “value on display everyday” means what it says:  union labor does the job right the first time so it doesn’t have to be redone. The prevailing wage law was enacted to maintain quality workmanship, strengthen local economies through construction work and prevent low wage, low skilled workers from undercutting the standard of living in our state.  For the sake of a few dollars now, the conservatives are throwing the dice with our money hoping that under skilled labor will not have to have their work redone by professionals.

Here is another tidbit… where prevailing wage laws have been repealed; overall wages have declined by 15 percent.  Can you take a 15 percent cut in pay?

Call your state senator and tell them to remove the prevailing wage laws from the budget and let it stand on its own.

While you’re on the phone, remind them that if they voted for SB 5, they really angered the wrong people… teachers, police, firefighters and the vast public and private-sector union members who will remember in November.

Everyone needs to take the time to do two things very soon, register to vote and sign a petition for the repeal of SB5.  Tim has petitions at the hall but you must sign one specifically for your county.  Please get there as soon as possible to get the repeal on the ballot.

In case you have not heard, the local’s website, iueclocal17.org, is up and running!  There is a wealth of information available including links to union and signatory contractor websites, a photo gallery of past events and information on upcoming events.  It is designed to be a user friendly way of keeping the local in touch with important union news from Cleveland and beyond.  Please take a few minutes and check it out.

All members will be receiving a letter from the local about American Income Life Insurance.  AIL is a union insurance company that offers a wide range of insurance products specifically designed for union members.  Along with the letter will be a response card to have an AIL representative contact you about their services.  You will also receive a packet of information covering their services and a no obligation consultation with one of their representatives.  This is a valuable opportunity to help secure the financial future of you and your family.

Where are they working?

Jeff Lindell and Anthony Young at the Browns Stadium doing escalator repair work for Kone,

Mike Miller and nick Meyer at the Cleveland Clinic Avon installing five hydros for Otis,

John Brunner and Taurus Ogletree at CSU installing a four-stop hydro for Schindler,

Bob Garman, Kevin Thomas and Joe Broz Jr. at Quicken Loans Arena cabling for Thyssen,

Mark Byram and Dave Lehotan doing cab work at Rainbow Apartments for Schindler,

Dave Brunner at Scott Hicks at the Cleveland Clinic installing three 4-stop hydros for Schindler,

Todd Kemp and Scott Erison installing a two-stop freight at VA Wade Park for Edmonds,

John Goggin, Gene Liss and Jason Costa cabling at Ohio Savings Plaza for Schindler,

Neil Beechuk and Bill Dudas installing a two-stop hydro at Midtown Tech for Thyssen.

June ’11 Elevator Constructor Article

Brothers and sisters:

When I was a helper, I had a mechanic ask me if I was crazy after a heated exchange with another mechanic.  I responded that crazy was a medical diagnosis that we were not qualified to make.  It was meant to diffuse his caution but it supports the tenuous line invisibly walked by ourselves and those around us.

There is no doubt that the constant and increased monitoring by the companies of the every move of their employees through GPS and other means puts additional stress on an already stressful job.  What quality of service can you give to a paying customer during your six minute maintenance visit?  If my phone is ringing every forty minutes to check on my location, how much am I really able to get done?  If my boss has me under the gun to get a job in, what level of  craftsmanship can the contractor expect?

The added relationship distractions of our spouse, co-workers, children, adult parents, siblings and neighbors can feel like chains weighing us down.

Then we start second guessing ourselves.  Did I really tighten that adjustment?  Was that the right parameter?  Where are all my jumpers?  Did I do the right thing with my kids or my spouse?  Why did I yell at my neighbor for no good reason?  Is it really worth going on?

When someone in trouble does decide to step into the void, those left behind are fraught with questions that no one on this plane can answer.  All we as outsiders can do is offer support to the survivors.

This brings me to a serious point brought up at the April union meeting.  If you or someone you know is troubled or seems to show signs of being troubled, do not just walk away.  Screw GPS and tasking, turn off your phone and take the time to truly listen to what your coworker is saying.  They may be reaching out to you as a last handhold before the abyss.

We make a difference in our daily work.  That difference cannot always be measured in profit or the number of callbacks we take.  Sometimes the measure is in how we treat each other.  There have been many times I spent an extra half hour in the coffee shop or took a long lunch to listen when a coworker was troubled and that time was paid back to me when I needed it.

The point is, take the time now.  Take the time now to praise someone for a job well done.  Take the time now to constructively correct someone when needed.  Take the time now to let your loved ones know how much you care.  Take the time now to ask for forgiveness or extend understanding.  Take the time now because you do not know how much you will have.

The International offers mental health services through the National Elevator Industry Benefits Plan.  If you are having a hard time coping with a situation, please, please, please seek someone out and get help.

NEIEP is looking for contributors to Lift Magazine, its educational supplement available to all members.  The upcoming issue covers new elevator technology.  You do not need to be a professional quality writer to contribute, just having the desire to share your knowledge with others.  If you are interested in becoming part of the team of compensated Lift contributors, send your resume to Jon Henson at jhenson@neiep.org or call 508-699-2200 extension 6115.

Brother Jeff Ford’s brother Joe was recently promoted to Captain and is currently serving in Iraq.  Please keep him in your prayers.

The local sends its most sincere condolences to the families of Brother Ryan Faber who passed away on March 31st and retired Brother James Horvath who passed away on March 25th.

‘till next month,

Work smart, work safe and slow down for safety.

Don

dknapik@windstream.net

Second welding class announced

Due to the strong response to the previous welding class put on by NEIEP, a second class has been announced.  The course runs for 40 hours and will lead to a 3G and 4G certification. Classes are run from June 13th through the 17th and June 20th through the 24th from 5:15 to 9:15.  Any IUEC Local 17 member interested in participating must deposit a $500 check to guarantee attendance.  If you are interested, then please contact Business Agent Tim Moennich at 216-431-8088 or at TMoennich@iueclocal17.org.

2011 Golf Outing Date Set

The 2011 Local 17 Golf Outing will be held on Saturday, June 11 at Mallard Creek Golf Course, 34500 East Royalton Road, Columbia Station.  The outing will start at 9 am and the cost will be $90 per person.  Of course, there will be food and drink at the turn and at the end of the day dinner and door prizes.  To reserve your spot, call Mike Hogan at 440-427-0004 or you can email him at m.hogan67@yahoo.com.